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Fusion Project
1996 Awardee
Budget: $9800.00
Project Director: Martha Copeland
Yellow Medicine East High School
450 9th Avenue
Granite Falls, Minnesota 56241
Phone: 612-564-4083
Email: mcopelan@informns.k12.mn.us

Summary
For seven months of the school year, three days per week, elementary students will come to the high school lab after school for ninety minutes and have an opportunity to participate in seven different physical science units designed and taught by high school students. The Fusion Project has two goals. One goal is to provide a science-based after school activity for elementary youth, especially girls and minorities. The second goal is to provide high school students with a diverse life experience that will include mentoring, exploring science content, and planning and evaluating a lesson, as well as providing a needed source of financial support.

Description
November found 4th-6th graders solving a Crime Scene. In December, the focus was on the Chemistry and Physics of Toys. January was the Periodic Table and February was catch-up month. There was a consistent enrollment of the elementary students (12-16 each month). During the month of January, the theme was "Elements, Gases, Polymers, and Crystals." Under this topic, the students spent about two or three days on each of the topics. For elements and gases, a Periodic Table of Elements was handed out to each child and described the basic components that made up the table. For the experimental part of the class periods, the staff gave the children a bunch of unknowns, and had them distinguish which ones were metals, metalloids, and nonmetals.

The week of studying gases was slightly challenging, but loads of fun. Before the young scientists were able to produce oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon, staff gave the children notes on the properties of gases. They also explained how to test for the gases by using a wooden splint that was either flaming or glowing. Each child received three chemicals, each in their own test tube, and three liquids, which would react with its companion chemical to produce one of the three gases. The children quickly discovered when using a glowing splint to test oxygen, the splint reignited; when using a flaming splint to test hydrogen the splint went out.

Finally, they were off to Polymers and Crystals. In this category, staff explained to the children what a polymer was and gave examples of various polymers in our everyday lives, i.e. balloons, plastics, and rubber. In the labs, they made slime, gak, putty, and rubber balls. They also used Polyurethane Foam part A and part B solution to produce foam. They also produced exquisite crystal gardens using table salt, water, laundry bluing, ammonia and a chunk of charcoal. In less than one day, the gardens were almost complete.

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Respect Water - It is Vital to Your Life
1996 Awardee
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Anne M. Holbrook
Staff: Carol Freas, Robert Lux, Barbara Riester, Renita Strange
Robert E. Lucas Intermediate School
3900 Cottingham Drive
Cincinnati, Ohio 45241
Phone: 513-563-4020
Email: holbrooa@k12.cnidr.org

Summary
This project is an integrated study of the basic physical and chemical principles concerning the properties of water for grades two through six. Each grade level will have a different concept to explore that has been developed around the student's local environment and appropriate instructional level of inquiry. Student-teacher teams will create five interactive videos and activity kits which: introduce a question, generate a hypothesis, guide students through the steps of a cooperative activity/experiment, demonstrate the safe use of equipment and materials, direct a data gathering session, and assist in formulating conclusions. These team experiences will be included within the video as direct application of the concepts. The video and activity/experiment kits will be evaluated by the students and teachers.

Description
The soil covering the Earth acts as a giant sieve. Soil particles have tiny spaces between them that allow water to trickle down into the soil layers. When a rain occurs these tiny spaces in the soil quickly fill with water, and the excess water, called surface water, runs over the top of the soil. When soil is moved by surface water it is called erosion. Water that filters through the soil trickles slowly downward, or percolates, through pores and cracks in the soil and rock layers. Rock strata and soil capable of holding water are called aquifers. Second grade students created a model of soil layers and discovered how water percolates through the layers.

Fourth graders explored the power of water by assembling a working water wheel. Students learned how to assemble a working water wheel, use water to power the wheel in order to lift an object, use the scientific process to record observations, write conclusions and draw a design for another use of a water wheel.

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Woah! Somebody Oughta Fix That Bump!
1997 Awardee
Budget: $9800.00
Project Director: Jim Reeves
Staff: Nathan Nease
Cooper High School
3639 Sayles Blvd.
Abilene, TX 79605
Phone: 915-691-1000
Email: reever@tenet.edu

Summary
This project involves high school physics students working with city and state civil engineers to determine which bumps in our city's streets are most hazardous when traversed at the legal speed limits. Students equipped with miniature accelerometers connected to calculator based lab systems and graphing calculators will collect and store data on the g-forces encountered by various cars as they are driven over bumps that are nominated in a city-wide survey as the most dangerous. Differential global positioning by satellite (DGPS) units will enable the students to locate and store the exact longitude and latitude of the bump. After locating and ranking the bumps, students, teachers, and a team of engineers will study the data and decide what steps should be taken.

Description
The students conducted a "worst bump" survey using the local newspaper and prepared drop boxes that were placed around town. The students used these to solicit nominations from the community of the most offensive bumps in town when they were negotiated at the speed limit. After collecting all the nominations, over 100 bumps were nominated for the study.

The students used Graphing Calculators and CBL systems as well as GPS in order to locate the position of these bumps and to record the acceleration when the bumps were traversed at the posted speed limit. The students then displayed and analyzed all of their data. By analyzing the acceleration versus time graph for each of the runs the students selected the ten most offensive bumps in Abilene. This project was supported by the local Automobile Association who lent the school the use of various vehicles from small to mid-size to vans so the students could investigate the impact of the bumps on each type of vehicle. After the analysis was completed, the students prepared a presentation for the local city council. The students presented the city council with data about the most offensive bumps, and made some suggestions on how these bumps might be ameliorated.

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Marine Vessel Education
1997 Awardee
Budget: $9900.00
Project Director: Glenn Springer
La Conner Middle School
513 N. 6th Street
La Conner, WA 98257
Phone: 360-466-4113
Email: adgr@gte.net

Summary
The Marine Education Project that is being developed within the LaConner Middle School will become an integrated community curriculum. The construction phase will be done by 7th and 8th graders using physical science (measurement, vectors, ratios, latitude, longitude, and computer simulations), math, technology, and craftsmanship to build and race four 10 foot sailboats. These vessels will be used to teach sailing through the parks and recreation department during the summer months and provide a means to introduce adolescents to water safety, marine occupations, and avocations. Working and racing as teams, students will see the connection between science in the classroom and application in the shop and on the water.

Description
Participants in the program have benefited in the following ways:

  1. Those students in the Water Safety Class learned all the components to earn a state certification in lifesaving but since they are under 15 years of age, they just need to wait a year, review again and take the test when it’s offered by a certified pool nearby.
  2. These same students also learned enough about navigation to plot a 4-day cruise through the San Juan Islands indicating on an overlay of chart 18421 their dead reckoned stops, magnetic headings, speed, time and distances to include three overnight moorages and facilities available at each.
  3. Students involved in building the first 2 Clancy sailboats have spent 4 hours on a computer sailing simulator and have developed the pride of craftsmanship.

Seventy students have been impacted by the project. Most of them became involved by signing up for these classes as electives in the regular semester class schedule. Sixty percent were male. As word spread about the success and fun derived from the classes, the project will touch the lives of all the students.

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Archaeology Research Program
1997 Awardee
Budget: $10,000.00
Project Director: James Calaway
Staff: Mike Haynie, Kyle Smith, Joseph Anderson, Susan Bearden
MacArthur Junior High School
510 NE 45th Street
Lawton, OK 73507
Phone: 405-353-5111
Email: jcalaway@ionet.net

Summary
In this unique program, archeologists will work with teachers and students on an actual dig site that includes historical artifacts from three different time periods. Students will use GPS systems with the most advanced metal detectors and technology available to do an Archeological survey and generate computer driven data for maps and reports that will be turned over to the state Archeological Society. All materials and processes will be collected in film and booklet form for replication by other school systems and interested communities. Students will be involved with every aspect of the research problem, including collection and identification of artifacts and making a documentary of the entire process for future use.

Description
About 20 sweating students in hats, tank tops, and T-shirts circle Joe Anderson to peer into what looks like an ordinary hole he has just dug. Anderson, an archaeologist, kneels beside it to show the students how much that ordinary hole on the edge of a grassy field can tell them. He uses a spade to point out a layer of brown dirt that drops from the ground about 8 inches. The brown color shows that farmers have plowed the Tillman County field many times over the past century. But the charred, black dirt found in the next layer shows what he and the students really are looking for: evidence of a military supply post established there 141 years ago. Anderson speculates he has found the ashes of a fire the Camp Radziminiski soldiers cooked over as they watched for Comanche Indian attacks in 1858.

The Lawton students have learned much about the area’s history before getting to the site. But they experience it on the first day of their weeklong excavation. The students will learn more when they dig a square test pit where a hole is. They’ll use tools to search for artifacts layer by layer. After the dig ends, the students will decipher the clues they found. The students have found square nails from the 1800s, a bullet, a brass clasp, a strap that may have come from a horse’s tack, buckles, and pieces of glass.

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Horse Cove Cave Conservation Project
1998 Awardee
Budget: $9500.00
Project Director: Randall Blackwood
Staff: John French, June Kalange, Paul Meyer, Joan I. Morris
Grissom High School
7901 Bailey Cove Rd.
Huntsville, AL 35802
Phone: 205-650-4340
Email: wblackwood@hsv.k12.al.us

Summary
This is a pilot study to develop community awareness, scientific information, and materials for "Horse Cove Cave Conservation Project." Students, a biologist, educators, and landowners will be participating in a hands-on research project with members of the Huntsville Grotto of the National Speleological Society and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Students will conduct in-class and field studies that incorporate skills in geophysical and biological sciences, scientific methodology, etc. Students will report their findings to appropriate conservation organizations, governmental agencies and the citizens of Horse Cove.

Description
The first phase of the project was a fully equipped field trip to caves in Horse Cove. Water quality monitoring continued throughout the year on the caves while the main effort of the students shifted to other objectives of the project.

The next phase of the project involved the mapping of geological features in Horse Cove. Geological features like sinkholes, springs, cave entrances, and other karst features were checked by the students using GPS devices. The data was collected and digitally recorded on an updated topographic map. The new map was given to landowners and developed to promote good stewardship of the land.

The final phase was the dissemination of information to wildlife biologists with the various government and nonprofit environmental agencies. It is believed that by increasing the awareness of the endangered species and their connections to water quality, careful planning will take place and preserve the environment.

Videos

 

Arcata High School Conservation and Alternative Energy
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Louis Armin-Hoiland
Staff: Will Bagnall, Earl Peters, Jack Sheppard

Arcata High School
1720 M Street
Arcata, CA 95521
Phone: 707-825-2400
Email: lah@nohum.k12.ca.us

Summary
Four Arcata High School students in the CEDAR Academy class have designed and will oversee this Conservation and Solar Energy Project. The CEDAR Academy students will coordinate the work of teachers and students in mathematics, physics, chemistry, global science, and vocational classes. The goals of the project are to reduce use of nonrenewable energy, implement the use of solar energy, and involve students in challenging, real-word projects. Students and teachers will do the following: perform energy audits of the entire school with the help of volunteers from the Redwood Community Action Agency Weatherization Program and PG&E; do research on, make designs for, and install a photovoltaic power system for Arcata High with the help of Campus Center for Appropriate Technology at Humboldt State University, and Six Rivers Solar, a business in Eureka; use the energy monitoring system installed in the photovoltaic system, the data from energy audits, and the design lab of the CEDAR Academy to analyze the energy inputs and outputs, and make recommendations to the school on ways to conserve energy and increase the use of renewable energy; educate the school and public about the project; work to continue and expand the project in the future.

Videos (Quicktime)

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Is It UVB or Not UVB? That is the Question!
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Kandace Glaser
Staff: Dorothy Satriana, Dwenna Holden, Hal Makofske

Lincoln Middle School
2287 Lema Rd SE
Rio Rancho, NM 87124
Phone: 505-892-1100 x235
Email: kglaser@lms.rrps.k12.nm.us

Summary
The project will target 6th and 7th grade students and their families. It introduces the electromagnetic spectrum focusing upon infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths. It teaches the uses, dangers, and protective measures associated with the focus waves. Nationally, one out of every twenty-five people is at risk of developing melanoma. In New Mexico, the risk is one in every seven. The students will participate in a variety of experiments and activities that will educate them on the facts and misconceptions associated with infrared and ultraviolet light, and they will learn procedures for leading a healthy outdoor life.

Document (Adobe PDF)

Building Blocks
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Bahadir Karuv
Bergen County Academies
200 Hackensack Ave
Hackensack, NJ 07601
Phone: 201-343-6000 x2310
Email: bahkar@bcacademies.bergen.org

Summary
The Building Blocks Program is planned to be the ultimate toolkit for young inventors. Once the student conceives a unique idea, the working model will be achieved by simply attaching the appropriate blocks and writing a "glue" program, utilizing a pre-written and tested code library. The Building Block concept was born out of the countless engineering projects that we have developed in the Invention Lab over many years, and it will be an ongoing project. The toolkit will consist many objects (detectors, relays, actuators, indicators modules) that will be designed to interface the real world with a simple, well-defined hardware/software protocol. At the core of the toolkit there will be a C compiler optimized CPU unit that will control the components. The building blocks will be supported with well documented C and BASIC language code libraries.

Document (Adobe PDF)

www.ScienceQuest - A Literature-Based Inquiry Edventure
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Michelle Evans
Staff: Carolyn Hogge, Shirl Weight

Valley Elementary School
7436 E 200 S
Huntsville, UT 84317
Phone: 801-745-3713
Email: dgarner@utah.uswest.net

Summary
The entire program will begin as teachers introduce students to the project and teach them some basic skills. Students will learn how to do research and Internet searches. They will be taught scientific methods of inquiry and experimentation. They will receive training in the writing processes required for the project. They will receive instruction in web site publication. Student experiments will be written into inquiry based booklets by the students. Each booklet will be written in terms that sixth grade students understand, become the basis for inquiry based study for years to come, and include interviews from each scientist. Booklets will include use of literary techniques like graphic organizers, student-made dictionaries, and illustrations. Booklets and experiments will also be placed on our school web site. In this way we can explore hypotheses, add to existing documentation, and add links as we pursue more Science Quest EDventures. Students will present their findings in three-community science EDventure Fairs where we explore and teach students, parents, and community members about each objective.

Website: www.ve.weber.k12.ut.us/ScienceQuestVES/index.htm

Document (Adobe PDF)

Wilson Bay: A Study in Plant Propagation, Wetland Restoration and Its Effects on Habitat Repopulation
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Shawn Reintjes
Staff: Pat Donovan-Potts, Dawn Hicks, Julie Baile

New Bridge Middle School
401 New Bridge St
Jacksonville, NC 28540
Phone: 910-346-5144
Email: sreintjes@hotmail.com

Summary
This project is a cooperative effort linking the City of Jacksonville, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and New Bridge Middle School. Its goals are three-fold: students will 1) recycle one of the drying beds at the City of Jacksonville's old Wastewater Treatment Facility located on Wilson Bay into a plant propagation bed for the purpose of wetlands restoration, 2) document the repopulation of the habitat and the differentiation among the three plant species within the habitat and finally, 3) convert the propagation bed into a living wetland model for educational purposes. Sampling protocols will be established to identify and examine phytoplankton, zooplankton, crabs, fish, birds, and other relevant species. Students will use CBL's and scientific probes to gather water quality data linking changes in water quality to species adaptability. Students will create databases for information gathered and PowerPoint presentations on their findings. Scientists from NCSU will serve as mentors for students involved in this project.

Documents (Adobe PDF)

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Going Deep!
Budget: $8,900
Project Director: Wendy Jantzen
Staff: Shane Dent, Carol Wagar, Jim Turner, Melody Scherich

Longfellow Junior High
900 E Broadway
Enid, OK 73701
Phone: 580-234-7022
Email: wdjantzen@hotmail.com

Summary
During the school year, the 8th grade teachers of Longfellow Jr. High will integrate a baseball theme in a holistic approach that includes all academic areas of study. The unit will involve the core curriculum and elective classes. We will begin our unit with a general introduction of the components of study and end by spending a day at the David Allen Memorial Ballpark, located in Enid, Oklahoma, putting skills to the test. Students will research many aspects of the game of baseball and tie them to English, social studies, math and science classes. They will be involved in group projects designed to promote good social skills with other students as well as with members of the community. It is our goal to increase their enjoyment for learning. Ultimately, we want to see them lay a foundation of skills that will help them become active, positive members of their own community tomorrow.

Document (Adobe PDF)

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Right click on the link and choose "Save Target as" to download to your hard drive. On a Macintosh hold "control", click the link and choose "Download link to Disk".

Science Sleuths
Budget: $10,000
Project Director: Kimberley Pinto
Staff: Debbie Smith

Burnett Creek Elementary
5700 N 50 W
West Lafayette, IN 47906
Phone: 765-463-2237 x350
Email: kimberleypinto@aol.com

Summary
Our goal is to prepare students' and teachers' minds for viewing and thinking about science and literacy in a new light. The project coordinator will facilitate a group of student Science Sleuths to "think about how they think." The science process skills will be their guide. Science-based literature will be the thread that pulls it altogether. Then they will take their talents on the road and appear on a weekly school-wide Science Sleuth TV program. This dynamic program will show the Sleuths' performing experiments that showcase the science process skills and connected pieces of science-based literature to the audience. This motivating tactic will entice and pull-together "thinkers" on two levels. All the while the teachers will be enhancing their "thinking" by attending school book talks, the HASTI conference, workshops with the Sleuths, and tapping into the wealth of science-based literature that is presented each week on TV. Another component of this plan is to create and maintain a Science Sleuth website for the school and global community to access information on the science process skills and how to become better "thinkers."

Videos (Quicktime)

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Right click on the link and choose "Save Target as" to download to your hard drive. On a Macintosh hold "control", click the link and choose "Download link to Disk".