Skip to main content
 

The Science Teacher—August 2019

As early as 1896, Swedish Nobel Prize winner Svante Arrhenius presented a hypothesis demonstrating that doubling the carbon dioxide content in Earth’s atmosphere would lead to a warming of its climate. By the 1950s, the higher temperatures Arrhenius had predicted began to be noticed, gradually increasing with ever-higher amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases being released into the atmosphere.
The Current Science Classroom: Wildfires in the Classroom

Journal Article

The Current Science Classroom: Wildfires in the Classroom

Current science classroom....

Idea Bank: Alien Dating

Journal Article

Idea Bank: Alien Dating

Tips and techniques for creative teaching....

Career of the Month: Interview with Mechanical Engineer Bill Chambers

Journal Article

Career of the Month: Interview with Mechanical Engineer Bill Chambers

Based on interviews with professionals using science in the workplace....

Right to the Source: Altering the Arid West

Journal Article

Right to the Source: Altering the Arid West

Exploring science and history with the Library of Congress...

The Carbon Cycle and Climate Change

Journal Article

The Carbon Cycle and Climate Change

Using an active, problem-based approach to understand the carbon cycle and climate change ...

Communities Take Charge

Journal Article

Communities Take Charge

Climate learning and changemaking in the science classroom...

Red Tide

Journal Article

Red Tide

Harmful algal blooms and global climate change...

Food Fight!

Journal Article

Food Fight!

Students design ways to take a bite out of climate change at school...

Editor's Corner: Keeping Curiosity Alive

Journal Article

Editor's Corner: Keeping Curiosity Alive

Notes from the field editor....

Focus on Physics: The Physics of Rainbows

Journal Article

Focus on Physics: The Physics of Rainbows

Building an understanding of physical principles. ...

Asset 2